New and Noteworthy: Steps to justice in El Estor, ADA turns 26, and interacting with people with disabilities

1.  Canadian Mining Company HudBay Minerals will be tried in Canadian courts for murdering, shooting, and gang-raping Guatemalans http://www.rightsaction.org/action-content/media-reports-precedent-setting-ruling-canada-against-hudbay-minerals-indigenous and http://www.chocversushudbay.com/ My posts tagged German Choc describe how the Guatemalan community El Estor was brutalized by the Canadian mining company HudBay Minerals. Between 2007 and 2009, eleven women from the town of Lote 8 were gang raped, community leader Adolfo Ich Chaman was murdered, and German Chub Choc was shot in an unprovoked attack. Since these attacks, German Chub Choc; Adolfo’s widow Angelica Choc; community leader Maria Choc; and Rosa Elbria Ich Choc and Margarita Caal Caal, two representatives from Lote 8 formed a delegation to seek justice against HudBay in the Canadian legal system. I am so happy to report that as declared on Tuesday, July 23rd, their case against HudBay will proceed to trial in Canada!

2. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) turned 23 goo.gl/nFrVfT AAPD (American Association for Persons with Disabilities) 2013 Interns produced this YouTube video explaining how the ADA has affected their lives.

3. Excellent Journalist Tiffiny Carlson gives an articulate explanation of 10 ways to interact with people with disabilities http://www.themobilityresource.com/10-correct-ways-to-interact-with-people-with-disabilities/ Tiffiny’s list is great, and I couldn’t agree more with Number 10 “the golden rule.” A few years ago, I was at the Association for Blind Citizen’s Holiday Party, having a great time meeting and chatting with folks with and without sight, but when two blind acquaintances started walking toward each other each unaware of each other’s presence, I became tongue-tied, unable to say the simplest thing to let them know each other was there because I was wracking my brain for the right thing to say to prevent them from bumping into each other. As they both came to a stop, aware of each other when their canes touched, I awkwardly asked, “so what do I say when I see someone blind about to bump into someone or something? Both people turned to look at me and said, “you can say stop.‘”

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2 comments

  1. Thanks for sharing – I volunteer as a judge for Maryland History Day and National History Day, and there was a really great documentary that some high-schoolers did on the ADA – I wish I could share it – they ended up winning one of the top places in the National Competition. And thanks for the list of 10 🙂

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