New and Noteworthy–Justification of Inequality

1. This past week, Katie Couric interviewed trans model Carmen Carrera and actress Laverne Cox. When Katie expressed her voyeuristic curiosity about the women’s transitions, they both responded with eloquence and grace about why her questioning was inappropriate.  Colorlines. “Laverne Cox remembers Islan Nettles while Schooling Katie Couric.” January 7. 2014. http://bit.ly/19ZXgZo

2. Last week, I participated in a training on Disability Justice, and re-read this “oldie but goodie” staple of the disability rights movement. This essay fits in well with the above interview, because Douglas Bayton describes how the belief that oppressed groups are disabled has been a reason for their exclusion throughout history, and sadly a counter response has involved the oppressed group insisting that they are not disabled, not denying that disability is a valid basis for exclusion.  Baynton, Douglas C. “Disability and the Justification of Inequality in American History.” 2001. http://www.disabilitymuseum.org/dhm/edu/essay.html?id=70 

3. The radio show Democracy Now! dedicated an episode to exploring the life and legacy to Amiri Baraka, a poet, playwright, and political activist, who passed away on January 9, 2014. Amiri Baraka started the Black Arts Movement, and in the 1960s the FBI identified him as “”the person who will probably emerge as the leader of the pan-African movement in the United States.”  Democracy Now! “Amiri Baraka (1934-2014): Poet-Playwright-Activist Who Shaped Revolutionary Politics, Black Culture.” January 10, 2014. http://www.democracynow.org/2014/1/10/amiri_baraka_1934_2014_poet_playwright?autostart=true

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Correction/Reflection on August 21, 2014–re-reading this post, I’m confused about why I included the tribute to Amiri Baraka with the other two topics, and even more irritated at myself that I had misspelled his name. I wonder what I was thinking–it seems more than a little “one of these things is different than the others” since Amiri Baraka was a virtuoso who used his considerable talent in progress toward equity via the Black Arts Movement. I think I probably just wanted to write about Amiri Baraka, and I will in a future post. For now, here is Questlove’s (drummer for The Roots) tribute to Amiri Baraka in the New York Times. 

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